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Posts for: December, 2016

By Arlington Dental
December 29, 2016
Category: Oral Health
LifeIsSometimesaGrindforBrookeShields

Ever since childhood, when her career as a model and actress took off, Brooke Shields has enjoyed worldwide recognition — through advertisements for designer jeans, appearances on The Muppet Show, and starring roles in big-screen films. But not long ago, that familiar face was spotted in an unusual place: wearing a nasal anesthesia mask at the dentist's office. In fact, Shields posted the photo to her own Instagram account, with the caption “More dental surgery! I grind my teeth!” And judging by the number of comments the post received, she's far from alone.

In fact, researchers estimate that around one in ten adults have dental issues that stem from teeth grinding, which is also called bruxism. (Many children also grind their teeth, but it rarely causes serious problems, and is often outgrown.) About half of the people who are teeth grinders report problems like persistent headaches, jaw tenderness and sore teeth. Bruxism may also result in excessive tooth wear, and may damage dental work like crowns and bridges; in severe cases, loosened or fractured teeth have been reported.

Researchers have been studying teeth grinding for many years; their findings seem to indicate that it has no single cause. However, there are a number of factors that play a significant role in this condition. One is the anatomy of the jaw itself, and the effect of worn or misaligned teeth on the bite. Another factor relates to changes in brain activity that occur during the sleep cycle. In fact, nocturnal (nighttime) bruxism is now classified as a sleep-related movement disorder. Still other factors, such as the use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs, and a high level of stress or anxiety, can make an individual more likely to experience bruxism.

What can be done for people whose teeth grinding is causing problems? Since this condition may have many causes, a number of different treatments are available. Successful management of bruxism often begins by striving to eliminate the factors that may cause problems — for example, making lifestyle changes to improve your health, creating a soothing nighttime environment, and trying stress-reduction techniques; these may include anything from warm baths and soft music at bedtime, to meditation and mindfulness exercises.

Several dental treatments are also available, including a custom-made occlusal guard (night guard) that can keep your teeth from being damaged by grinding. In some cases, a bite adjustment may also be recommended: In this procedure, a small amount of enamel is removed from a tooth to change the way it contacts the opposite tooth, thereby lessening the biting force on it. More invasive techniques (such as surgery) are rarely needed.

A little tooth grinding once in a while can be a normal response to stress; in fact, becoming aware of the condition is often the first step to controlling it. But if you begin to notice issues that could stem from bruxism — or if the loud grinding sounds cause problems for your sleeping partner — it may be time to contact us or schedule an appointment. You can read more about bruxism in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Stress and Tooth Habits.”


By ARLINGTON DENTAL
December 23, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Invisalign   braces   orthodontics  

The need for some form of orthodontic treatment is very common in children and teenagers. But according to a report in The Wall Street invisalignJournal, the number of adults getting orthodontic treatment well past puberty and the adolescent years has risen by as much as 40 percent since the mid-90s. While it is never too late to undergo necessary orthodontic and dental treatment, bite and alignment problems (also known as malocclusions) are generally easier to treat in childhood, while the teeth and dental structures are still developing.

Adults who get braces often have to wear them for longer periods, ranging from 18 months to three years, which can potentially deter adults from getting the orthodontic treatment they need. Invisalign clear aligner trays offer an alternative to traditional metallic braces. Dr. Joseph Reed, a general and cosmetic dentist in Arlington, TX, recommends Invisalign for adults and older teenagers looking for a discreet and non-invasive option to get straighter teeth.

Get Straighter Teeth with Invisalign in Arlington, TX

The Invisalign system is very straightforward and simple to use. After a comprehensive dental exam and evaluation, a set of clear aligner trays are custom designed for each person. Each tray is worn for approximately two weeks. In addition to being practically "invisible," Invisalign trays offer many advantages over traditional braces, including:

  • Can be removed for up to two hours each day for eating, brushing, and flossing
  • Are generally worn for 15 months, cutting down treatment time from traditional braces
  • Non-invasive
  • Do not disrupt nutrition, oral hygiene and lifestyle habits
  • Affordable

Most adults and older teenagers are generally eligible for orthodontic treatment with Invisalign.

Find a Dentist in Arlington, TX

More and more men and women have achieved straighter, more symmetrical and attractive smiles without traditional braces, thanks to Invisalign clear aligner trays. For more information, and to find out whether Invisalign is right for you, contact Arlington Dental by calling (817) 303-5700 to schedule a consultation with Dr. Reed today.


By Arlington Dental
December 14, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: geographic tongue  
ThoseRedPatchesonYourTongueareNothingtobeAlarmedAbout

If you've ever been alarmed to find oddly-shaped red patches on your tongue, you can relax for the most part. Most likely, you're part of a small fraction of the population with a condition known as geographic tongue.

The name comes from the irregular shape of the patches that seem to resemble land formations on a map. Its medical name is benign migratory glossitis, which actually describes a lot about the condition. The patches are actually areas of inflammation on the tongue (“glossus” – tongue; “itis” – swelling) that appear to move around or migrate. They're actually made up of areas where the tiny bumps (papillae) you normally feel have disappeared: the patches feel flat and smooth compared to the rest of the tongue.

We're not sure why geographic tongue occurs. It often runs in families and seems to occur mostly in middle-aged adults, particularly women and non-smokers. It's believed to have a number of triggers like emotional stress, hormonal disturbances or vitamin or mineral deficiencies. There may also be a link between it and the skin condition psoriasis. Under a microscope the red patchiness of both appears to be very similar in pattern; the two conditions often appear together.

The bad news is we can't cure geographic tongue. But the good news is the condition is benign, meaning it's not cancerous; it's also not contagious. It poses no real health threat, although outbreaks can be uncomfortable causing your tongue to feel a little sensitive to the touch with a burning or stinging sensation. Some people may also experience numbness.

Although we can't make geographic tongue go away permanently, you should come by for an examination to confirm that is the correct diagnosis. Once we know for sure that you do have migratory glossitis, we can effectively manage discomfort when it flares up. You should limit your intake of foods with high acidity like tomatoes or citrus fruits, as well as astringents like alcohol or certain mouthrinses. We can also prescribe anesthetic mouthrinses, antihistamines or steroid ointments if the discomfort becomes more bothersome.

It may look strange, but geographic tongue is harmless. With the right care it can be nothing more than a minor annoyance.

If you would like more information on benign migratory glossitis, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Geographic Tongue.”