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Posts for: June, 2017

BracesTakeAdvantageofTeethsNaturalAbilitytoMove

There are many new and exciting ways now to transform an unattractive smile into one you'll be confident to display. But not all “smile makeover” techniques are new — one in particular has been around for generations: using braces to correct crooked teeth.

Braces have improved the smiles (and also dental health) for millions of people. But as commonplace this orthodontic treatment is, it wouldn't work at all if a natural mechanism for moving teeth didn't already exist. Braces “partner” with this mechanism to move teeth to better positions.

The jawbone doesn't actually hold teeth in place — that's the job of an elastic gum tissue between the teeth and bone called the periodontal ligament. Tiny fibers extending from the ligament attach to the teeth on one side and to the bone on the other. In addition to securing them, the dynamic, moldable nature of the ligament allows teeth to move incrementally in response to forces applied against them.

To us, the teeth feel quite stationary (if they don't, that's a problem!). That's because there's sufficient length of the tooth roots that are surrounded by bone, periodontal ligament and gum tissue. But when pressure is applied against the teeth, the periodontal ligament forms both osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) and osteoclasts (bone-resorbing cells) causing the bone to remodel. This allows the teeth to move to a new position.

Braces take advantage of this in a controlled manner. The orthodontist bonds brackets to the outside face of the teeth through which they pass a thin metal wire. They attach the ends of the wire to the brackets (braces), usually on the back teeth. By using the tension placed in the wire, the orthodontist can control the gradual movement of teeth to achieve proper function and aesthetics. The orthodontist continues to monitor the treatment progress, while making periodic adjustments to the tension.

It takes time, but through this marvelous interplay between nature and dental science you'll gain a more healthy and beautiful smile.

If you would like more information on improving your smile with orthodontics, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Moving Teeth with Orthodontics.”


By ARLINGTON DENTAL
June 20, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures

Hate to smile? With options like dental bonding and reshaping, your dentist can help you love your smile again. Dr. Joseph Reed at cosmetic dentistryArlington Dental in Arlington, TX, offers a full range of dental services, including dental bonding and reshaping. Here's everything you need to know about bonding and reshaping.

Dental Bonding Overview

Bonding is the application of tooth-colored resin materials using a special light, which bonds the materials to the teeth to transform a patient's smile. Bonding is routinely used to repair teeth that are chipped, decayed or cracked. Bonding is also used to improve the appearance of discolored teeth and close gaps between teeth.

Benefits of Dental Bonding

Bonding can usually be done in one office visit. Very little tooth enamel is removed with bonding procedure, which gives it an advantage over options like dental crowns and veneers. 

Tooth Reshaping Overview

Tooth reshaping is a procedure that involves removing some of the enamel in order to change the shape, surface or length of one or more teeth. Tooth reshaping is an effective method to correct dental imperfections, such as: smoothing out pits or bulges in a tooth's enamel, adjusting irregular tooth shapes, fixing small chips and adjusting the length of the teeth.

Benefits of Tooth Reshaping

Tooth reshaping is an inexpensive way to enhance your smile. There is generally no discomfort during the procedure and anesthesia isn't required. In some cases, tooth reshaping can make teeth look straighter and eliminate minor overlapping.

So, what are you waiting for? If you want a better-looking smile, this is your chance! Call Arlington Dental at (817) 303-5700 to schedule a consultation in Arlington, TX. Remember, a better life starts with a better-looking smile.


ActorDavidRamseyDiscussesBabyBottleToothDecay

Cavities can happen even before a baby has his first piece of candy. This was the difficult lesson actor David Ramsey of the TV shows Arrow and Dexter learned when his son DJ’s teeth were first emerging.

“His first teeth came in weak,” Ramsey recalled in a recent interview. “They had brown spots on them and they were brittle.” Those brown spots, he said, quickly turned into cavities. How did this happen?

Ramsey said DJ’s dentist suspected it had to do with the child’s feedings — not what he was being fed but how. DJ was often nursed to sleep, “so there were pools of breast milk that he could go to sleep with in his mouth,” Ramsey explained.

While breastfeeding offers an infant many health benefits, problems can occur when the natural sugars in breast milk are left in contact with teeth for long periods.  Sugar feeds decay-causing oral bacteria, and these bacteria in turn release tooth-eroding acids. The softer teeth of a young child are particularly vulnerable to these acids; the end result can be tooth decay.

This condition, technically known as “early child caries,” is referred to in laymen’s terms as “baby bottle tooth decay.” However, it can result from nighttime feedings by bottle or breast. The best way to prevent this problem is to avoid nursing babies to sleep at night once they reach the teething stage; a bottle-fed baby should not be allowed to fall asleep with anything but water in their bottle or “sippy cup.”

Here are some other basics of infant dental care that every parent should know:

  • Wipe your baby’s newly emerging teeth with a clean, moist washcloth after feedings.
  • Brush teeth that have completely grown in with a soft-bristled, child-size toothbrush and a smear of fluoride toothpaste no bigger than a grain of rice.
  • Start regular dental checkups by the first birthday.

Fortunately, Ramsey reports that his son is doing very well after an extended period of professional dental treatments and parental vigilance.

“It took a number of months, but his teeth are much, much better,” he said. “Right now we’re still helping him and we’re still really on top of the teeth situation.”

If you would like more information on dental care for babies and toddlers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Age One Dental Visit” and “Dentistry & Oral Health for Children.”